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Do PIV Units Work?

Do PIV Units Work?

Because they’re so cheap to install and run, many people have doubts about the effectiveness of PIV units.

After all, if PIV units can improve air quality and reduce condensation, damp and mould, why do people spend so much on air conditioning? Do PIV units work?

The short answer is yes. PIV units work, and their effect is transformational.

We’ve installed PIV units in homes where the owners thought they would have to leave because of relentless damp problems. A few weeks after installing PIV units, and their home was given a new lease of life.

For the long answer, keep reading.

Environ Property Service
Last Updated 23 August 2018

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PIV units create air flow through positive air pressure

To understand how a PIV unit works, first you need to understand air flow and air pressure.

From global wind currents to chilly draughts in your house, air moves the same way: from areas of high air pressure to areas of low air pressure.

This means that if the air pressure inside your house is lower than outside, cold air will be pulled in, while the stale, moisture-heavy air inside your house stays put.

If the moisture in your home’s air is too high, it will collect on cold surfaces, causing condensation, damp and mould – all of which can damage your property and negatively affect your health.

By increasing the air pressure inside your house, air will naturally be pushed outside through existing vents, along with the moisture and allergens it contains.

This is exactly what PIV units do. By constantly ventilating your home with fresh air from your loft or outside, PIV units create positive air pressure at a fraction of the cost of an MVHR (mechanical ventilation with heat recovery) unit or full house air conditioning.

The science is simple and the results are dramatic.

Immediately after you switch on your PIV unit, you’ll notice an improvement in air quality and, over time, your condensation, damp and mould problems will be reduced – if not eliminated entirely.

PIV units work in both houses and flats

All we require to be able to install a PIV unit is a wall where we can cut out a hole between your home and an air source.

The simplest way to install a PIV unit is to place it between the loft and the floor below. Air from the loft is pulled into the rest of the house to create positive air pressure, without any need to heat it.

If you do not have a loft or it has been converted, PIV units can also pull in air from outside the house. However, you may need a PIV unit which heats the air so that you’re not also cooling your house in winter months.

PIV units which heat the air have slightly higher running costs, but this is typically offset by reduced heating demand as you can enjoy fresh air in cold weather without having to open windows.

In blocks of flats, PIV units can either be installed on an external wall or on a wall that joins to a shared stairwell or hallway. As long as you can pull air inside your home, you can install a PIV unit.

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Call us now for the cheapest PIV installation in London

Not only are PIV units cheap to run, they’re cheap to install as well – as long as you get us to do it. We can install your PIV unit from just £950+VAT. If you need help finding the right PIV unit for your home, we’re also happy to source one for you from our trusted suppliers. Call us now or request your call back to find out more about PIV units or book your installation.